4tronix

Sort By:  
Designed with learning in mind
R89.90  Inc VAT
This neat little board plugs directly into the Raspberry Pi GPIO header and provides 2 or 4 connectors for small stepper motors
R299.90  Inc VAT
Pi Stop - Traffic Light Add-on for Raspberry Pi (GPIO 3.3V stand traffic light)

The Pi-Stop is a low cost hardware module designed to allow Raspberry Pi users to take their first steps into interfacing with the real world.

Designed with the learning in mind, everyone will recognise and identify its familiar elements encouraging their use along-side their own projects.

Move past the Stop light

The Pi-Stop is designed to remove many of the common hurdles people are faced with when getting started using hardware with the Raspberry Pi. Often it is difficult to know what components to use and how to connect them, the Pi-Stop makes it simple by plugging directly onto pre-set positions on the Raspberry GPIO connector.

By plugging the Pi-Stop directly on to the Raspberry Pi GPIO header, no extra cables or wires are needed. Unlike many other add-on boards, they do not block unused GPIO pins, keeping them open for other uses. The Pi-Stop can be fitted in 4 standard locations, allowing up to four Pi-Stops to be controlled independently or combined with other hardware.

Prepare to go!

The Pi-Stop provides a simple stepping stone, between pure screen based programming and using physical hardware to interact with the real world. Components like the Pi-Stop will provide a flexible and non-restrictive way to build understanding through experimenting.

Since it is only a step away from a bag of components, it also allows the programming of hardware to be introduced, and the electronics involved can be introduced separately, if desired. Allowing the pupils to discover they can control real things, and then again to discover they can also build their own circuits and control them in exactly the same way.

Often, people are faced with a magic board which they plug in and tell it to do stuff, however it isn't always clear to them why or how it does it. By providing something which they can remove and replace with something (apparently) completely different (- wires, breadboards and LEDs) they will be able to understand the link.

By keeping the hardware very simple, it allows better understanding of what is happening, and allows space to come up with your own projects and apply the concepts with your own ideas in mind.

GO Full throttle

The documentation and guides are openly available for the Pi-Stop for educational use. There will be guides, tutorials and workshop material available all of which can be taken as is[available as PDF format] or adapted to your own needs [available in markdown format].

It is encouraged that similar materials can be submitted back for others also to share and make use of.

The materials will demonstrate the concepts, methods and provide the building blocks to explore ideas and take learning further by with creative projects, activities and games.

Pi-Stop Documentation

The following material is available (in both PDF and markdown format):

Designed with learning in mind
R89.90  Inc VAT
PiStep2 Quad Stepper Motor Control Board for Raspberry Pi (PiStep2 stepper hat)

This neat little board plugs directly into the Raspberry Pi GPIO header and provides 2 or 4 connectors for small stepper motors

  • Fully Assembled - No Soldering Required
  • Raspberry Pi Zero Form Factor - works with all versions of Raspberry Pi with 40pin GPIO connector
  • Stepper motors and Raspberry Pi not included

Various Power Options:

  1. Powered from the Raspberry Pi 5V
  2. From the 2-pin Terminal (whatever voltage is required for the motors)
  3. Micro-USB - 5V only

Pinout is simple:

  • Physical pins 11, 12, 13, 15 for Motor A (GPIO 17, 18, 27, 22)
  • Physical pins 16, 18, 22, 7 for Motor B (GPIO 23, 24, 25, 04)
  • Physical pins 33, 32, 31, 29 for Motor C (GPIO 13,12,6,5)
  • Physical Pins 38, 37, 36, 35 for Motor D (GPIO 20,26,16,19)

Each pin has an associated white LED so you can see the stepper signals going through

Power Supply Alternatives

  • Jumper VCC-VSTP (default). Power from the motors is taken from the Raspberry Pi 5V line
    • Micro-USB into Raspberry Pi. 5V for the Pi and the stepper motors goes through a poly-fuse which can trip if 2 motors are used simultaneously
    • Micro-USB into the PiStep board. 5V for both the Pi and the stepper motors is provided directly from the 5V USB input so no problems with 2 motors at once
  • Jumper VSTP-VIN. Power for the motors is provided from the 2-pin screw terminal, so can be any voltage that the steppers can handle. Ensure you use the correct polarity! We recommend to keep it below 12V. You will find that the stepper motors can go up to 9V and will be able to step faster, the higher the voltage that is applied, but there will be some deterioration of the life of the stepper motor at a higher voltage.

Python Programming

Please see the excellent example here for some pointers. You will need to change the pin numbers as above and also change the speed so it steps at a visible rate. You may also want to remove the print statements to speed it up. The lines in Red below are changed from the original to operate Motor A.

# Use BCM GPIO references
# instead of physical pin numbers
GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BCM)

# Define GPIO signals to use
# Pins 18,22,24,26
# GPIO24,GPIO25,GPIO8,GPIO7
StepPins = [17,18,27,22]

# Set all pins as output
for pin in StepPins:
  print "Setup pins"
  GPIO.setup(pin,GPIO.OUT)
  GPIO.output(pin, False)

# Define some settings
StepCounter = 0
WaitTime = 0.01

ScratchGPIO Programming

These pins are identical to those required by ScratchGPIO and therefore can easily be driven using simple Scratch commands:

Set motor type for Scratch to be Stepper motor

Set the position of the stepper motor A

Set the speed of the stepper motor A

This neat little board plugs directly into the Raspberry Pi GPIO header and provides 2 or 4 connectors for small stepper motors
R299.90  Inc VAT
Per Page      1 - 2 of 2
  • 1