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The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass, LED display, and Bluetooth technology built in.
R199.90  Inc VAT
R269.90
The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass, LED display, and Bluetooth technology built in. V2 now with microphone and speaker
R329.90  Inc VAT
R289.90  Inc VAT
The MonkMakes Relay for micro:bit is a solid-state (no moving parts) relay that allows an output of a micro:bit to turn things on and off.
R149.90  Inc VAT
pin:bit breaks out all of the useful pins from your micro:bit into breadboard format while providing handy-dandy labels to make your builds go smoothly.
R129.90  Inc VAT
R199.90  Inc VAT
The MonkMakes Sensor Board for micro:bit allows you to sense sound level, temperature and light level.
R189.90  Inc VAT
This pre-built Edge Connector Breakout Board for the micro:bit gives access to all the important pins on the bottom edge of the micro:bit.
R112.90  Inc VAT
micro:bit board V1 (micro:bit board V1)

Video on micro:bit https://youtu.be/Wuza5WXiMkc

The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass, LED display, and Bluetooth technology built in.

It measures 4cm by 5cm, is available in a range of colours, and designed to be fun and easy to use. It can be coded with something simple in seconds – like lighting up its LEDs or displaying a pattern – with no prior knowledge of computing.

It also connects to other devices, sensors, kits and objects, and is a companion to Arduino, Galileo, Kano, littleBits and Raspberry Pi, acting as a spring board to more complex learning.

Each element is completely programmable via easy-to-use software on a dedicated website that can be accessed from a PC, tablet or mobile.

Product Overview

Containing 1x micro:bit and a Quick Start Guide in a single retail pack, this is the ideal option for makers to get started creating BBC micro:bit projects and inventing solutions (requires a USB cable for programming purposes, and a battery holder & 2x AAA batteries to power your BBC micro:bit if not connected to your computer - sold separately). The micro:bit is a pocket-sized computer that you can code, customise and control to bring your digital ideas, games and apps to life. Measuring 4cm by 5cm, and designed to be fun and easy to use, users can create anything from games and animations to scrolling stories at school, at home and on the go - all you need is imagination and creativity. The micro:bit is completely programmable. That means each of its LEDs can be individually programmed as can its buttons, inputs and outputs, accelerometer, magnetometer and Bluetooth Smart Technology. The micro:bit has a website full of coding languages, lesson plans, tutorials, and fun ideas
  • Size: approx. 5cm x 4cm
  • Weight: 8g
  • Microprocessor: 32-bit ARM® Cortex™ M0 CPU
  • A 5x5 LED matrix with 25 red LEDs to light up and can display animiated patterns, scrolling text and alphanumeric characters
  • Two programmable buttons. Use them as a games controller, or control music on a smart phone
  • On-board motion detector or 3-AXIS digital accelerometer that can detect movement e.g. shake, tilt or free-fall and use it to control motion activated games
  • A built-in compass, 3D magnetometer to sense which direction you're facing and your movement in degrees and detect the presence of certain metals and magnets
  • Bluetooth® Smart Technology. Connect the micro:bit to other micro:bits, devices, phones, tablets, cameras and other everday objects
  • Five Ring Input and Output (I/O) including power (PWR), ground (GRD) and 3 x I/O. The micro:bit can read values from sensors and control things like motors or robots
  • 20 pin edge connector: This allows the micro:bit to be connected to other devices such as Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Galileo and Kano through a standard connector
  • Micro-USB controller: This is controlled by a separate processor and presents the micro:bit to a computer as a memory stick
  • System LED x 1 yellow
  • System push button switch x 1

Applications

Embedded Design & Development

Contents

1 x micro:bit board

More info available at https://microbit.org/guide/

The micro:bit pins http://microbit.org/guide/hardware/pins/

Explore the many features of micro: bit at http://microbit.org/guide/features/

And loads more great links available at http://microbit.org/index/

Program micro:bit using Raspberry Pi at https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/getting-started-with-microbit

The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass, LED display, and Bluetooth technology built in.
R199.90  Inc VAT
R269.90
micro:bit GO Kit V2 (micro:bit V2 GO kit)

Video on micro:bit https://youtu.be/Wuza5WXiMkc

The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass, LED display, and Bluetooth technology built in.

It measures 4cm by 5cm, is available in a range of colours, and designed to be fun and easy to use. It can be coded with something simple in seconds – like lighting up its LEDs or displaying a pattern – with no prior knowledge of computing.

It also connects to other devices, sensors, kits and objects, and is a companion to Arduino, Galileo, Kano, littleBits and Raspberry Pi, acting as a spring board to more complex learning.

Each element is completely programmable via easy-to-use software on a dedicated website that can be accessed from a PC, tablet or mobile.

Product Overview

Get creative, get connected & get coding with the micro:bit go. A complete set containing all the parts and inspirational ideas to get started with the micro:bit. Each micro:bit go contains 1x micro:bit, USB cable, battery holder & 2x AAA batteries along with a Quick Start Guide featuring 4 fun ideas all in a retail ready pack. The micro:bit go is the quickest and easiest way for children to get going with the micro:bit. The micro:bit is a pocket-sized computer that you can code, customise and control to bring your digital ideas, games and apps to life. Measuring 4cm by 5cm, and designed to be fun and easy to use, users can create anything from games and animations to scrolling stories at school, at home and on the go - all you need is imagination and creativity. The micro:bit is completely programmable. That means each of its LEDs can be individually programmed as can its buttons, inputs and outputs, accelerometer, magnetometer and Bluetooth Smart Technology. The micro:bi
  • Microprocessor: 32-bit ARM® Cortex™ M0 CPU
  • A 5x5 LED matrix with 25 red LEDs to light up and can display animiated patterns, scrolling text and alphanumeric characters
  • Two programmable buttons. Use them as a games controller, or control music on a smart phone
  • On-board motion detector or 3-AXIS digital accelerometer that can detect movement e.g. shake, tilt or free-fall
  • A built-in compass, 3D magnetometer to sense which direction you're facing and your movement in degrees and detect the presence of certain metals and magnets
  • Bluetooth® Smart Technology. Connect the micro:bit to other micro:bits, devices, phones, tablets, cameras and other everday objects
  • 20 pin edge connector: This allows the micro:bit to be connected to other devices such as Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Galileo and Kano through a standard connector
  • Micro-USB controller: This is controlled by a separate processor and presents the micro:bit to a computer as a memory stick
  • Five Ring Input and Output (I/O) including power (PWR), ground (GRD) and 3 x I/O.
  • System LED x 1 (yellow)
  • System push button switch x 1

Applications

Embedded Design & Development

Contents

1 x micro:bit V2 board
1 x USB cable
1 x Battery holder
2 x batteries


More info available at https://microbit.org/guide/

The micro:bit pins http://microbit.org/guide/hardware/pins/

Explore the many features of micro: bit at http://microbit.org/guide/features/

And loads more great links available at http://microbit.org/index/

Program micro:bit using Raspberry Pi at https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/getting-started-with-microbit

The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass, LED display, and Bluetooth technology built in. V2 now with microphone and speaker
R329.90  Inc VAT
micro:bit v2 (micro:bit v2)

micro:bit v2 is a brand new, super-charged version of the popular pocket-sized codeable computer, brought bang up to date with a microphone, speaker and upgraded processing capabilities.

With over four times the processing power and eight times as much RAM as the original micro:bit this new model opens up a world of new possibilities! We're especially excited about how well MicroPython will run on the new model where previously the limited RAM was a struggle.

Features

  • Upgraded processor (nRF52833)
    • 64MHz Arm Cortex-M4 + FPU (over 4 times faster!)
    • 512KB Flash storage on board
    • 128KB RAM
  • MEMS Microphone with LED indicator and on-board speaker
  • 5x5 LED matrix display
  • Touch sensitive logo "button"
  • Accelerometer/compass
  • Light and temperature sensors
  • Sleep/off mode for batteries powered projects (w/ LED indicator)
  • Up to 200mA of current for external accessories
  • Bluetooth 5.0 radio allowing micro:bits to talk to each other
  • Notched edge connector (easier to connect things like crocodile clips and conductive thread)
  • Dimensions: 52mm x 42mm x 11.7mm

It's the same shape and size so should be already familiar to countless teachers and learners, and also compatible with the vast majority of add-on boards and accessories.

How does the BBC micro:bit work?

It's programmed with beginner friendly, drag and drop interface MakeCode with the option to progress into MicroPython later on, opening up even more programming possibilities!

It's packed with inputs, outputs, sensors and radio communication features that can be combined into and endless variety of projects.

Inputs and outputs: An important part of any computer system. As a very small computer, the BBC micro:bit has plenty of inputs and outputs to learn about and use.

LEDs: An LED, or light-emitting diode is an output device that gives off light. Your BBC micro:bit has a display of 25 LEDs for you to program.

Buttons: A very common input device. Your micro:bit has two "clicky" buttons and a touch sensitive button you can program, and a reset button.

Radio: A way of sending and receiving messages and BBC micro:bits can use radio waves to communicate with each other.

Accelerometer: A motion sensor that measures movement. The accelerometer in your BBC micro:bit detects when you tilt it left to right, backwards and forwards and up and down.

Compass: An input sensor that detects magnetic fields. Your BBC micro:bit has an inbuilt compass that can detect the direction in which it is facing.

Light sensor: An input device that measures light levels. Your BBC micro:bit uses the LEDs to sense the levels of light and lets you program your micro:bit as a light sensor.

Temperature sensor: An input device that measures temperature. Your BBC micro:bit has a temperature sensor inside the processor which can give you an approximation of the air temperature.

Pins: On the bottom edge of your BBC micro:bit there are 25 gold strips, called pins. These pins allow you to really get creative. You can create circuits, connect external things like buzzers and motors and make your own fun projects.

Sound: Your BBC micro:bit can be programmed to make a wide variety of sounds - from single notes, tones and beats to your own musical compositions.

Requires:

  • microB USB Cable for programming
  • Computer/laptop with Internet access
R289.90  Inc VAT
10 x micro:bit V2 Essentials Kits Club Bundle (micro:bit club V2)

Product Overview

Perfect for sharing the micro:bit with friends, the micro:bit club is a 10 pack containing all the pieces needed to enjoy micro:bit in STEM groups, coding clubs, school classes, scouts, guides and cubs or any other social gathering (contains 10 BBC micro:bits, 10x USB cables, 10 x battery holders & 20x AAA batteries). The micro:bit is a pocket-sized computer that you can code, customise and control to bring your digital ideas, games and apps to life. Measuring 4cm by 5cm, and designed to be fun and easy to use, users can create anything from games and animations to scrolling stories at school, at home and on the go - all you need is imagination and creativity. The micro:bit is completely programmable. That means each of its LEDs can be individually programmed as can its buttons, inputs and outputs, accelerometer, magnetometer and Bluetooth Smart Technology. The micro:bit has a website full of coding languages, lesson plans, tutorials, and fun ideas to help you get creative

Program micro:bit using Raspberry Pi at https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/getting-started-with-microbit

More info available at https://microbit.org/guide/

The micro:bit pins http://microbit.org/guide/hardware/pins/

Explore the many features of micro: bit at http://microbit.org/guide/features/


And loads more great links available at http://microbit.org/index/
  • Upgraded processor (nRF52833)
    • 64MHz Arm Cortex-M4 + FPU (over 4 times faster!)
    • 512KB Flash storage on board
    • 128KB RAM
  • MEMS Microphone with LED indicator and on-board speaker
  • 5x5 LED matrix display
  • Touch sensitive logo "button"
  • Accelerometer/compass
  • Light and temperature sensors
  • Sleep/off mode for batteries powered projects (w/ LED indicator)
  • Up to 200mA of current for external accessories
  • Bluetooth 5.0 radio allowing micro:bits to talk to each other
  • Notched edge connector (easier to connect things like crocodile clips and conductive thread)
  • Dimensions: 52mm x 42mm x 11.7mm

Applications

Embedded Design & Development

Contents

10 x micro:bit V2 boards(please note we cannot select the colour of the micro:bit you will receive)
10 x USB cables
10 x battery holders
20 x AAA batteries.

R3,049.90  Inc VAT
Relay for micro:bit (micro:bit Relay board)

The MonkMakes Relay for micro:bit is a solid-state (no moving parts) relay that allows an output of a micro:bit to turn things on and off.

A micro:bit can turn an LED on and off directly, but anything more powerful requires something like a relay or a transistor. Using a transistor to switch something on and off requires a shared ground connection with the micro:bit and a knowledge electronics that you or your students may not be ready for. The MonkMakes Relay for micro:bit is much easier to use, acting like a simple micro:bit controlled switch.

This relay can be used to switch low voltage devices such as light bulbs, a motor, a small heating element or even a string of 12V LED lighting. The voltage needs to be kept under 16V, but the relay will automatically protect itself against too much current.

FEATURES

  • Solid-sate relay (up to 2 Amps)
  • Active LED indicator
  • Resettable ‘polyfuse’ to protect against over-current

Getting Started

Connecting your micro:bit

The Relay requires just two connections to the micro:bit. One to GND (ground) and one to whatever pin is to be used to control the relay’s switching action.

When attaching the alligator clips to the micro:bit, make sure that the clips are perpendicular to the board so that they are not touching any of the neighbouring connectors on the micro:Bit edge connector.

Here’s an example of how you could wire up a MonkMakes Relay for micro:bit to turn an old fashioned light bulb on and off.

HEX File

The quickest way to try out your relay is to DOWNLOAD THIS HEX FILE >and then copy it onto your micro:bit. The program will turn the relay on and off once a second.

JavaScript Blocks Editor

Set the controlling pin to 1 and the relay contacts will close, set it to 0 and the contacts will open again. Its as simple as that. So, to make your relay turn on and off once a second, open the Blocks Editor, add a forever block and then the digital write blocks from the pins category and the pauses from the basic category.

MicroPython

Paste the following code into the Python window and then Download the file and copy it onto your your micro:bit.

from microbit import *

while True:
    pin0.write_digital(True)
    sleep(500)
    pin0.write_digital(False)
    sleep(500)



Analog Outputs

The latest MonkMakes Relay for micro:bit can do more than just switch things on and off. It can also be used with micro:bit analog outputs. Look closely at your Relay for micro:bit and is it has the version number v1ev (under the word ‘Board’) then it can be used with the ‘analog write’ block in the blocks editor or the ‘write_analog’ function in MicroPython. If your board has the version number v1e then it is not suitable for use with analog outputs – sorry you were unlucky to get one of the small batch of first boards to be sold.

The output of the Relay for micro:bit is not linear at low PWM and high PWM values as the following chart illustrates.

The y-axis shows the current in mA for a test load resistor supplied from a constant voltage source. The x-axis is the analog write value (0 to 1023). As you can see, there is a dead zone up to a analog output value of about 100, followed by a relatively good linear region right up to about 1000, after which the output effectively becomes ‘on’.

The tests were carried out at the default PWM frequency of 50Hz for the micro:bit. Lower frequency PWM is expected to produce more linear results.

The MonkMakes Relay for micro:bit is a solid-state (no moving parts) relay that allows an output of a micro:bit to turn things on and off.
R149.90  Inc VAT
pin:bit for micro:bit (pin:bit )

pin:bit breaks out all of the useful pins from your micro:bit into breadboard format while providing handy-dandy labels to make your builds go smoothly.

It's ideal for building small circuits on a breadboard, and for exploring what different types of components like LEDs, buttons, and analog sensors do and how they work.

Just slot in your micro:bit and then hook up to its pins with a breadboard or by connecting jumpers directly. We've broken out every spare pin on the micro:bit that isn't shared with the LED matrix, so your projects won't interfere with the built-in functionality.

Features

  • Comes fully-assembled and ready to use
  • Pins exposed:
    • 3V and GND
    • Analog channels 0, 1, and 2 (these are the large pads on your micro:bit)
    • I2C bus interface
    • SPI bus interface
    • GPIO pins 0, 1, 2, 5, 8, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19, and 20
  • Plugs straight into your breadboard (not included)
  • Compatible with micro:bit (not included)
  • No soldering required!
pin:bit breaks out all of the useful pins from your micro:bit into breadboard format while providing handy-dandy labels to make your builds go smoothly.
R129.90  Inc VAT
Servo for micro:bit (servo for micro:bit)

The MonkMakes Servo for micro:bit board provides a really easy way to attach up to three servomotors to a BBC micro:bit. The board requires a power supply or battery pack to provide 5 or 6V to the servomotors. It includes a voltage regulator that will supply 3V back to the micro:bit, so that you don’t have to power it separately.

Features

  • Header pins for three servo motors
  • Up to 2A total can be supplied to the servo motors
  • Regulated 3V output to power your micro:bit
  • Polarity protection for the servomotors
  • Electrolytic reservoir capacitor for the servomotors
  • 1kΩ series resistors to the control signals to prevent accidental sort-circuits of the micro:bit’s output pins.
  • Orange LED to indicate that the Servo for micro:bit board has power.

Connections

The picture below shows a typical setup using the Servo for micro:bit board.

The following connections have been made:

  • 3 x servomotors plugged into header pins. These need to be the right way around, with the control signal (yellow or orange wire) to the left (pins marked c).
  • Alligator clip lead from GND on the micro:bit to GND on the Servo for micro:bit board.
  • Optional alligator clip lead from 3V on the micro:bit to 3V on the Servo for micro:bit board. You only need this if you want to power the micro:bit from the same battery pack as the servomotors. If you want to power the micro:bit over USB or the JST battery connector then you do not need this connection.
  • Alligator clip leads between P0, P1, P2 on the micro:bit to the Servo for micro:bit board. These need to match up with the servomotors you are using, so if you only need the board for one servomotor, then just connect P0 on the micro:bit to P0 on the Servo for micro:bit and make sure that there is a servomotor attached to the header pins marked 0.
  • Power to the screw terminal on the Servo for micro:bit. Typically this will be a 4xAA battery pack or other power supply. Make sure that the positive lead goes to the screw terminal marked with a +

Test Software

To check that everything is working, this Blocks code project will get you started. Flash it onto your Servo for micro:bit and the servo arms should all start waggling in a random manner. You can see a video of this in action here.



The servo write pin block allows you to set the angle of the servomotor’s arm between 0 and 180 degrees. Note that servomotors, will not usually travel a full 180 degrees so you may find the actual range is more like 10 to 170 degrees.




R199.90  Inc VAT
Sensor for micro:bit (micro:bit sensor board)

The MonkMakes Sensor Board for micro:bit allows you to sense sound level, temperature and light level.

Features

  • 3V and GND connections can be made from either side and allow you to power a second board such as the MonkMakes Relay Board or MonkMakes Speaker.
  • LED ‘power on’ indicator
  • Reverse polarity protection
  • All three sensors are analog and can be connected to pins P0, P1 and P2 using alligator clips.

Getting Started

Connecting to your micro:bit

You only have to wire up the sensors that you are actually using, but you could wire all the sensors up as shown below. The code examples below assume that pin 0 is used for sound, pin 1 for temperature and pin 2 for light. You can use any pin for any of the sensors, but remember to modify the code to match the pin you are using.

Sound

The Sensor for micro:bit uses a MEMs (microphone on a chip) and a pre-amplifier. The output of the sound sensor is connected to an analog input where it can be sampled. The sound signal varies about the 1.5V level. So, silence will produce an analog output of around 1.5V. When there is sound the analog readings will oscillate above and below the 1.5V level like this:

This is why 511 is subtracted from the readings in the code examples below.

JavaScript Blocks Editor

Here is an example of using the Sensor Board to display a bargraph to indicate the sound level. Click on the image below to try it out. Making a noise into the microphone will make the LEDs dance.

MicroPython

from microbit import *

def bargraph(a):
display.clear()
for y in range(0, 5):
if a > y:
for x in range(0, 5):
display.set_pixel(x, 4-y, 9)

while True:
sound_level = (pin0.read_analog() - 511) / 100
bargraph(sound_level)

Temperature

The Sensor for micro:bit uses a thermistor to measure temperature. The temperature output from the board is a voltage that indicates the temperature. This is then measured using an analog input on the micro:bit.

The calculations for converting this voltage reading to an actual temperature are quite complicated and so the code examples here will only give a rough idea of temperature.

If you want your temperatures in Fahrenheit, then multiply the temperature in degrees C by 9, divide the result by 5 and then add 32.

JAVASCRIPT BLOCKS EDITOR

This is an example of using the Sensor Board to display the temperature, try putting your finger on the temperature sensor to warm it up. You can run the example below by clicking on it.

MicroPython

from microbit import *

while True:
reading = pin1.read_analog()
temp_c = int(reading / 13.33 - 14)
display.scroll(str(temp_c))
sleep(500)

Light

The light sensor uses a phototransistor to measure the light level and produces an output voltage that increases as the light level increases. Here is a guide to the kind of light level you might get from the sensor under different conditions (0 to 1023).

  • Dark 0 to 3
  • Dimly lit room 6 to 10
  • Indoors directly under a light 10 to 50
  • Outdoors (dull day) 100 to 200
  • Outdoors (sunny day) 800 to 900

Even though the maximum analog read value is 1023, the maximum reading from this sensor is around 900.

JAVASCRIPT BLOCKS EDITOR

Here is an example of using the Sensor Board to display a bargraph to indicate the light level. Click on the image below to try it out. Put your finger over the light sensor to make it dark or shine a flash-light onto it to make more LEDs light up.

MicroPython

from microbit import *

def bargraph(a):
display.clear()
for y in range(0, 5):
if a > y:
for x in range(0, 5):
display.set_pixel(x, 4-y, 9)

while True:
light_level = pin2.read_analog() / 10
bargraph(light_level)


The MonkMakes Sensor Board for micro:bit allows you to sense sound level, temperature and light level.
R189.90  Inc VAT
Kitronik Edge Connector Breakout Board for micro:bit (Edge connector micro:bit)

This pre-built Edge Connector Breakout Board for the micro:bit gives access to all the important pins on the bottom edge of the micro:bit.

Looking to do more with your micro:bit? Unlock its potential with this pre-built version of our Edge Connector Breakout Board! This breakout board has been designed to offer an easy way to connect additional circuits and hardware to the pins on the edge of the micro:bit. It provides access to all of the micro:bit processor pins allowing a lot of extra functionality to be added. The datasheet (below) includes a helpful diagram explaining the function of every pin on the micro:bit.

This Edge Connector Breakout Board for the micro:bit gives access to all of the important pins on the bottom edge of the micro:bit. 21 pins are broken out in total; providing additional I/O lines, direct access to buttons A and B, the LED matrix outputs and the I2C bus. Please refer to the datasheet below for more details.

The micro:bit pins are broken out to a row of pin headers. These provide an easy way of connecting circuits using jumper wires. The SCL and SDA pins are separated at the edge of the board (solder pads) providing easy identification. The PCB includes a prototyping area with 3V, 0V and unconnected rows that can be soldered to. This allows the easy connection of switches, sensors and any pull-up or pull-down resistors etc. as required.

To use the breakout board the micro:bit should be inserted firmly into the connector as shown below:

Note:

  • This product is supplied with straight double row PCB pin headers already soldered to the breakout board

Features:

  • Features a dedicated pin strip for quick and easy prototyping
  • Breaks out 21 pins from the edge of the micro:bit
  • Dedicated prototyping area with 3V and 0V rows
  • Labelled pins and clear, straightforward documentation

Contents:

  • 1 x Edge Connector Breakout Board for the micro:bit, pre-built

Dimensions:

  • Length: 60mm
  • Width: 40mm
  • Height: 11.8mm

Video available at https://youtu.be/bzm4zepbGAc

Requires:

Resources:

This pre-built Edge Connector Breakout Board for the micro:bit gives access to all the important pins on the bottom edge of the micro:bit.
R112.90  Inc VAT
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